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Orijinz Quiz #1

A link at the bottom of the page takes you to the answers

guess the word

 

Origin:

The root of this word, meaning "to close the eyes or lips," referenced religious rites and myths that were to remain a secret. This theological definition evolved to mean something unclear and difficult to explain.

guess the word

 

Origin:

A drink that includes rum and sugar named after a beach or village in Cuba.  F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in his 1920 novel "This Side of Paradise." 

guess the phrase

 

Origin:

Meaning "to annoy" this phrase likely refers to petting a cat from the back towards the head rather than the other way around.

guess the word

 

Origin:

Likely an alteration of a British word for a gilded brass ring used in a con game in which a brass ring is sold as a gold one.

guess the word

 

Origin:

From Japanese words meaning "empty hand."  Think martial arts...

guess the word

 

Origin:

From the Venetian custom of keeping ships from plague-stricken countries waiting in port for 40 days.

guess the phrase

 

Origin:

This phrase, now meaning "startled," has a nautical origin.  It refers to when a ship's is suddenly stopped because a sudden gust of wind flattens the sails against the mast.

guess the word

 

Origin:

From an Old English word meaning "male horse."   When "man" was added to the end, it referred to a squire who walked or rode a horse beside a person of high honor. Today the word refers a loyal aide, often one who engages in illegal activities for a powerful crime boss. 

guess the fruit

 

Origin:

The Portuguese used this word, which developed from a Sanskrit word for "counselor," to describe Chinese officials. This fruit's name comes from the orange color of a the robes these officials' wore.

guess the phrase

 

Origin:

This phrase, with a nautical origin from the 16th century, has two key words.  The first key word meant the ship was traveling into the wind. The second key word meant the ship was sailing with the wind at its back. Sailors put the words together to mean they would go where the wind took them.  The phrase now means "in general" or “all things considered” or “for the most part.”

guess the word

 

Origin:

In the 17th century, a Brit led a plot to blow up Parliament. The plot was discovered beforehand and the perpetrators were seized and later put to death. On November 5th 1605, Londoners were encouraged to celebrate the King's escape from assassination by lighting bonfires.  Human likenesses made of tattered and stuffed clothes were burned on the bonfires.   These likeness came to be called by this word and later use of the word was extended to a person of strange appearance or dress. In the US, the word came to mean simply “man” and in time, especially in its plural form,  “a person of either sex.”